"Quality First ,Credit First"

even the experts count on reno surprises

by:Taian Lamination Film     2020-09-21
Don\'t be discouraged if you encounter obstacles in the winter Renault program.
The DIY disaster happened to the best of us.
Even Brian bowler himself.
Sometimes things don\'t go his way, and to prove it, listen to Brian yard 3 this Sunday (9 p. m. , HGTV).
This season, Baeumler moved his growing family from the city to the clumsy countryside, where he broke the basic rules of living on site during his renovation.
\"All those who write with questions will eventually see my family going through all kinds of possibilities,\" Baeumler said . \".
\"When you have kids, careers and all this stuff, they see what it\'s like to go through a major Renault in your home.
Things that are out of order, the changes that are made, the costs and pressures that you take on.
Even people like me who do this every day will be pleasantly surprised. ”So fret not.
The host of HGTV is handed over to Brian and co-
The Canadian Handyman Challenge star knows what you\'re going through.
He can help.
In a conversation with Alex Nino Gheciu, Baeumler answers questions from Star readers about annoying smells, cold caves and foggy windows. Hi, Bryan.
We live in an old house in the Valley area.
There is an ongoing problem with an unpleasant smell --like sewage —
Come through the middle of the house.
We can walk for a few weeks without smell, but it will always come back.
We \'ve tried everything we can think of, from the stove to the cleaning pipe, fixing the broken pipe under the basement, and the City Camera --
Check the sewer.
We don\'t know what to do next.
Thank you for your help. Cat C.
Funny, cat!
You seem to have completed all the correct steps so far.
It\'s good that you have city cameras-
Check the sewer.
You may also want to see if you have a sewage pump.
Also check out the floor drain in the basement to make sure there is a P-trap there —
It is basically a device, shaped like the letter \"p\", filled with water, preventing sewer gas and other things from entering the house.
I think the city inspectors should have a look and verify that they are stuck with the sealing primer on it;
Basically, every time you open the water somewhere, a few drops will enter P-
Make sure it\'s full of traps.
Otherwise, the water will evaporate and you will bring the gas from the sewer into your house.
In an old house, it is difficult to evaluate the problem without seeing it.
I\'m a little overwhelmed, cat.
One thing you might want to do is buy a heat recovery ventilator (HRV)—
It takes some stale air from your basement, brings fresh air from the outside, while filtering it out when it comes in.
This can be a solution when the stench comes up.
You may also want an environmental testing company to come in and check the air in your home.
Other than that, no one could guess without me going there and putting my nose into the corner of the basement.
But, it sounds like you\'re on the right track by eliminating the possibility.
Go ahead.
Dear Brian: sometimes we have a bad smell at home, especially when the stove or air conditioner has not been running for a while.
From the air inlet, the smell enters the second floor.
The former owner built a steam room in the basement.
But this has not been used for more than five years.
Sometimes the smell comes from the cabinet where the steam engine is located.
What do you think?
Do you know a reliable company that I can call to confirm the source of this smell?
Thank you very much. Greg K.
It seems like everyone has a bad smell in their house!
The first thing I want to ask is: when was the last time you cleaned the pipe?
If this is an old home, it is likely that there will be some rat feces and a lot of dust, as well as a variety of other things collected in these air, which will return to your vents.
This will definitely accumulate and start to smell.
As for someone coming in to identify the source of the smell, I don\'t think there are too many people who specialize in smell detection.
But of course you can get someone to come in and do an air quality test and try to determine what\'s in the air, if any.
I would definitely recommend cleaning the pipe to see if this is the root of the problem.
If the steam room has not been used for many years, I will not doubt that it will cause problems with moisture and mold, but it is certainly possible.
Brian: will the heated ceramic/porcelain floor make room temperature to a comfortable level in the sunroom where I don\'t have it heated?
Based on the following information: 1)
Should the floor be insulated? 2)
How much energy/cost does it take to run? The sunroom, 5. 5-by-
15 feet, is an old addition in front of my 104-year-old house.
It is about 4 feet metres from the ground and completely enclosed below.
Its exterior is covered with foam insulation and vinyl siding.
The interior walls and ceilings are also insulated.
Three of the four walls are windows and two.
5 feet wall under the window. Thank you! Linda A.
Linda, tororowell, I can imagine this house!
We did a lot of work on a house that sounded exactly like this.
I don\'t think there\'s a basement under the floor-
This is just a crawling space.
If so, there are several options.
You can heat it under the floor and remember that your steam barrier is now under your feet.
Alternatively, you can heat the walls outside the crawl space and heat them in the area below to keep the area warm.
In-
Floor heating is a good choice.
You can do a sauna inside if you want.
A Canadian company called Warmup produces an industrial cable that runs quite cheaply.
Of course, your cost depends on how often you keep the heat and heat in your room.
But the price is reasonable and efficient.
My concern is that if you put the ceramic or porcelain floor inside, I would like you to put a very good underwear and unwrap system --
Like WEDI\'s underwear.
Because you definitely want to make sure these tiles don\'t move around and break.
The only problem In-
The floor heating is that it will dry everything in the room because it will only provide heat
No humidity and airflow.
So, to moderate the humidity inside, you might also want to run a supply line to get the air back into that room.
Our study is too cold and uncomfortable.
Our home was built in 1988 and the study was extended by 12 feet in 1998.
Maybe because of the distance from the stove (about 65-70 feet). The den is 11-by-
30 feet, there is a window area opposite the back wall, and there is another window and patio door along the wall from the back corner.
All the windows are double. paned.
We have a baseboard heater.
I have read about the plastic film attached to the window and then heated it with a hairdryer to shrink and tighten it.
What do you think of this product? Mark S. Brighton, Ontario.
Well, Mark, a lot of additions and extensions are cold.
When the original house was built, the furnace and heating system were put into use, ideally adjusted, which meant that the baffles in certain areas were closed to increase the air pressure in other areas, and push the warm area to the farther end of the house.
If this does not happen, you may need to have the HVAC company come in for airflow testing;
With the flow meter, they can go over all the air pipes and know how much air is coming out of there.
Then, in the nearest place to the stove where you get the most air, they can turn off the baffle slightly, pressurize the air, and push it into your study.
This is the first thing I will try.
In terms of plastic film, this is a great product for single pane glass or old double pane glass.
If these windows are post-80, they are most likely not the most efficient ones --
I assume they are vinyl and there is some airflow through them.
Plastic film air-
Completely seal the window and limit the loss of heat through the window.
So this is a good idea.
A lot of people do this in the winter, just like opening the storm window to add a layer of protection.
I would also like to know if there is air return in that room, because if not, the air in the stove will be discharged, but it will pressurize that room and you can only get a limited amount of heat in it, because there is no air back to bring the cold air back to the stove. Good luck!
Brian: I have 100-year-
Old house with stormy windows.
How to prevent the accumulation of moisture inside the external storm?
I have completely sealed the inside and outside windows with amazing effects.
I was told to leave a small hole in the storm outside in order for the air to flow.
It\'s useless. Thank you. Gary M.
If you are still condensation inside the storm window outside, let me know that you have not completely sealed the window inside.
It is clear that there is warm and humid air outside the window.
You might want to try again in terms of sealing.
Of course, sealing the window with tape is one thing.
But it\'s actually a steam seal.
There it does not allow those tiny droplets of steam to pass through and enter that space --
It\'s a completely different thing.
In addition, if you open the window when there is already moisture, then there is already moisture in the air of that space.
So when it gets cold, it will condense in the nearest place to it, that is, the glass.
The reason you didn\'t condense inside the double or triple glass windows is that they have actually been put together and sealed under vacuum.
Sometimes they insert inert gas in it.
Ar is one of them-
This will actually replace the air there and there won\'t be any moisture.
If you seal two pieces of glass together in a good summer, they look very clear and once the weather gets cold, the moisture in the air will condense and you will start to see the fog.
So you don\'t seal them completely, that\'s the problem!
This is common in old houses because even the walls themselves leak air.
Bryan Baeumler shows up in new homes and apartments twice a month.
He was left to Brian\'s owner at 10 on Monday night. m. and co-
Whether it\'s on Canadian HGTV or at the Canadian Handyman Challenge, it\'s a star.
Send the on-site repair problem you gave Brian to Newhomes @ the star.
There is a ca for \"Brian\" in the subject line.
Contact him at baeumler.
Ca on Facebook or Twitter @ bryan_baeumler.
Custom message
Chat Online
Chat Online
Chat Online inputting...
Sign in with: